A Multi-Actor, Multi-Method Panel Study on Solidarity in Family Relationships

 

The Netherlands Kinship Panel Study is the Dutch participant in the Generations and Gender Programme (GGP). The GGP is a system of nationally comparative surveys and contextual databases, which aims at improving the knowledge base for policy making in countries of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)

 

The Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI), Utrecht University (UU), the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and the University of Amsterdam are participating in the development of a large-scale database on Dutch families: the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study (NKPS). The NKPS received an investment grant from the Dutch national research foundation (NWO). The research questions revolve around the theme of solidarity, which is defined as 'feelings of mutual affinity in family relationships and how these are expressed in behavioural terms'. Four waves of an extensive face-to-face interview have been conducted (Wave 1 in 2002 - 2004, Wave 2 in 2006 2007, Wave 3 in 2010 2011, Wave 4 in 2014).

   

 

The NKPS has four special features that make it highly innovative:

Earlier surveys (with the exception of those carried out for statistical purposes by Statistics Netherlands) are smaller, they seldom have a prospective design, they only occasionally gather data from residential kin (and hardly ever from non-residential kin) and rarely combine qualitative and quantitative methods. The programme is motivated by both scientific and societal considerations. Dutch family sociology has been losing ground during a time in which family relationships have been changing rapidly. The increasingly complex nature of contemporary family relationships has posed society and policymakers with a series of new and challenging questions. With the NWO investment funding, family sociology has been given a serious impulse to find answers. The NKPS with its large-scale, multi-actor, multi-method panel design will put Dutch family research among the international vanguard. To encourage interested academic researchers to use the NKPS-data, they have been made available to the broader research community. A codebook is available and workshops have been organized.

Codebooks and questionnaires can be downloaded from this website on the codebook page.
To register as a data user please go to the NKPS Data Center and click on the "Register" link in the navigation frame.

The NKPS is a collaboration between scientists from a number of Dutch universities and research institutes. The Scientific Team responsible for wave 4 consists of Pearl Dykstra and Sean de Hoon (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Aafke Komter (Utrecht University), Aat Liefbroer (Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute) and Claartje Mulder (University of Groningen). The Scientific Team responsible for waves 1 and 2 consisted of Pearl Dykstra (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Aafke Komter and Trudie Knijn (Utrecht University), Matthijs Kalmijn (University of Amsterdam), Aat Liefbroer (Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute) and Claartje Mulder (University of Groningen). The Scientific Team responsible for wave 3 consisted of Pearl Dykstra (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Aafke Komter (Utrecht University), Aat Liefbroer and Eva-Maria Merz (Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute) and Claartje Mulder (University of Groningen).

For background information on the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study, feel free to download either of the following documents.

NKPS-EN.pdf Netherlands Kinship Panel Study (NKPS-EN.pdf, 245kb)

TiesThatBind.pdf Family Relationships: The Ties That Bind (TiesThatBind.pdf, 389kb)


Ingrid Arnet Connidis, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario was asked to put the NKPS in an international context for the “Families in Flux” conference in The Hague, Netherlands in 2009. She gave a lecture titled:

Building on Strength and Breaking New Ground: Reflections on the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study and the “The Ties That Bind” Research Programme

 

 

While comparing the NKPS to Canada and the United States, she spoke about intergenerational ties between parents and children, foreign-born versus native-born families, marital status differences, sibling ties and childlessness which all represent aspect of continuity and change in family life.

.. changes in family life are often viewed as problematic, as indicators of family decline, and as a major break from the past. Yet, from a long-range perspective, the changes that concern us today represent a transition to new family forms rather than a breakdown in family life. As researchers, our challenge is to assess what has changed and what those changes mean for the negotiation of family relationships across the life course.

Connidis2009.pdf The whole text can be downloaded here. (Connidis2009.pdf, 97kb)